706MKIIG

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Dennis David
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706MKIIG

#1

Post by Dennis David » Sat Oct 02, 2010 10:13 pm

Hi,

Anybody own an IC-706MKIIG? I just bought one and I thought Yaesu's were hard to figure out. I have a bunch of question as the manual tells you how to do something but not what that something really is for. I'm just trying to program some repeaters but I don't understand the difference between repeater operation and the one touch repeater function. According to the instructions I should se FM-T when I have set the sub-audible tone frequency. While we'r at it I don't quite get SPL either. :shock:
Dennis David
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DaveK
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Re: 706MKIIG

#2

Post by DaveK » Sun Oct 03, 2010 12:25 pm

Congrats on the new purchase. The 706 is a terrific radio and it should serve you very well. The initial learning curve on getting to know your radio always seems difficult. With a little use it will become as second hand as the Yaesu.

The SPL function allows split frequency operation. This makes it possible to transmit and receive on two different frequencies. This is commonly used for repeaters, and referred to as the input frequency and the output frequency. As I recall, the one touch repeater function allows you to custom select the settings for a split operation with a push of a button, or two.
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xtatik
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Re: 706MKIIG

#3

Post by xtatik » Sun Oct 03, 2010 3:03 pm

Actually, the "split" function on a HF rig is used primarily for HF DX functions. When a large pile-up develops, the DX station may "split" his listening and transmitting freq's in order discern stations and call them in whatever order he chooses. If you've ever heard a pile-up on HF (numerous stations calling their callsigns) but couldn't hear who they were calling....chances are, you were listening to an operator who was managing a split pile-up. If you hear this again, try scanning the band anywhere from 5-10 Khz above or below the pile-up. You'll likely hear the DX station pulling callsigns from the pack. Also, if you call a CQ'ing DX station and either he or another operator tells you "Up" or "5 up" or anything in that likeness, you should immediately stop calling and assume he's operating "split". Discontinue trying to call him on his calling freq. Hit the SPL button and adjust it accordingly (whether 5 up or down) and find the pile-up and begin calling there. The split button will allow you to hear his calling freq. while you are transmitting on the pile up freq.
Randy
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Dennis David
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Re: 706MKIIG

#4

Post by Dennis David » Sun Oct 03, 2010 5:44 pm

Thanks guys for responding. Randy that makes sense even though it will be a while before I'll be able to tackle DXing . So the SPL is not really something I need to use for local 2m/440 repeaters because the "split" is already set correct? So how do I get the FM+T to show up on the display? If it's not showing up am I doing something wrong?

Setting up an X200 antenna on my balcony as well. I hope it works better than what I am currently using which is a mobile antenna. Need to see if I can get my son to help me next week so I don't pitch myself over the rail! :o
Dennis David
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Re: 706MKIIG

#5

Post by DaveK » Sun Oct 03, 2010 6:39 pm

You can use the split function on 2m FM for repeaters that do not use the traditional offset, but as Randy mentioned, it is used more often on the HF bands.
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xtatik
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Re: 706MKIIG

#6

Post by xtatik » Sun Oct 03, 2010 8:20 pm

Dennis, nearly all modern HF radios will have a "quick split" feature as part of the split freq. function. It usually defaults to a 5 khz split up from the receiving (your listening VFO) freq.
I'd refer to split frequency function info in your manual. It will tell you how to activate the split function and how to tune accordingly. As for the FM split function...I haven't a clue, as I only play FM when I need to. Perhaps the repeater techies can "splain"

I might add, there is a game to be played by the responding pile-up in split operation as well. When a DX station says "listening up" .....he'll usually mean that he's listening 5khz up. More specifically, what he is really telling you is that is the central area for where he'll be answering stations. It pays to tune a couple Khz up and down from that position in order to find some separation and be heard over the rest. Also, depending on whether you're operating on LSB or USB, you need to be aware of how your signal is being heard at the other end. On Upper Sideband (USB) your voice will sound higher in pitch the more you deviate higher in the band from a listening point. A higher pitched signal can be easier to discern and you'll stand a better chance of getting picked from the pack.
Randy
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cruiserlarry
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Re: 706MKIIG

#7

Post by cruiserlarry » Sun Oct 03, 2010 9:40 pm

While I can't help you with the 706 specifically, I might be able to help explain the "odd-split" function as used on the FM bands...

Most repeater pairs have a standard pair of frequencies designated for receive and transmit - for example, the standard 2 meter frequency pair are 600khz apart, with the transmit frequency being either above (+) or below (-) the receive frequency. On occasion, an FM repeater pair uses an "odd-split", which are a pair of transmit / receive frequencies that are a different spread than the norm. To accommodate this, most FM radios have an "odd-split" feature that allows you to program the transmit and receive frequencies separately, so that you can save it into a memory channel and use it like the pre-programmed standard split repeater pairs....

Hope that helps... :D
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h2005
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Re: 706MKIIG

#8

Post by h2005 » Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:41 am

Check out the knowledge base on Icom's website. I've used it for my Ic 706 mk II G
http://www.icomamerica.com/en/support/kb/default.aspx

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h2005
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Re: 706MKIIG

#9

Post by h2005 » Sat Mar 23, 2013 7:28 am

Info for Odd Split programming
http://n3twt.org/?page_id=23

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