Programming in presets

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dlichterman
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Programming in presets

#1

Post by dlichterman » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:21 am

Hey everyone -

I've been studying up for the test which I will be taking at Borregofest this month, but I have a question about programming in presets. What way do you all program them in, by callsign? By name/location? I don't think I'd be able to memorize every preset in my radio....so do most of you have a cheat sheet with the callsign, name/location, and preset number? I better bring my laptop with me.....

Thanks,
-Daniel

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Chazz Layne
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Re: Programming in presets

#2

Post by Chazz Layne » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:31 am

I cheat and use the programming cable/software that can be purchased for most Yaesu radios. Programming all that stuff by hand is way too much work. :D

They're all labeled by name or location, which makes them reasonably easy to find. I also sort by memory bank—bank 1 holds the common simplex frequencies I use, bank 2 is Arizona, bank 3 is California, etc. I don't have that many programmed in as there's typically only a handful of busy repeaters in each region, so it's not to hard to find what I'm looking for out of the bunch.

I also carry both the paper repeater directory and an electronic copy on my iPad/iPhone (Freq Finder) just in case.
Chazz Laynedotcom

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dlichterman
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Re: Programming in presets

#3

Post by dlichterman » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:44 am

Chazz Layne wrote:I cheat and use the programming cable/software that can be purchased for most Yaesu radios. Programming all that stuff by hand is way too much work. :D

They're all labeled by name or location, which makes them reasonably easy to find. I also sort by memory bank—bank 1 holds the common simplex frequencies I use, bank 2 is Arizona, bank 3 is California, etc. I don't have that many programmed in as there's typically only a handful of busy repeaters in each region, so it's not to hard to find what I'm looking for out of the bunch.

I also carry both the paper repeater directory and an electronic copy on my iPad/iPhone (Freq Finder) just in case.
I have the cable thank god, programming by hand would drive me crazy. I don't have multiple banks, so I will need to think about organization. I'll look into the paper/electronic directories.

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DaveK
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Re: Programming in presets

#4

Post by DaveK » Tue Oct 09, 2012 1:50 pm

The programming software is a terrific tool to quickly add, modify or delete memory entries. It comes in very handy for many things, including transferring repeaters or frequencies to others without the necessity of repeated manual entries.

The software, however, should not take the place of learning how to program your radio. There will be occasions in the field or elsewhere when your computer is not available, and you will need to know how your radio works. I recommend that you manually enter enough repeaters or frequencies so as to become comfortable with the procedure and will remember it when the time comes.

As far as organization is concerned, it is largely a matter of personal preference. In SoCal, there are lots of repeaters, usually named after the peak on which the transmitter is located. If call signs work better for you, then try that. If you have the software, it an easy matter to change names to suit your preference.

Good luck on the exam.
DaveK
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dlichterman
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Re: Programming in presets

#5

Post by dlichterman » Tue Oct 09, 2012 3:09 pm

DaveK wrote:The programming software is a terrific tool to quickly add, modify or delete memory entries. It comes in very handy for many things, including transferring repeaters or frequencies to others without the necessity of repeated manual entries.

The software, however, should not take the place of learning how to program your radio. There will be occasions in the field or elsewhere when your computer is not available, and you will need to know how your radio works. I recommend that you manually enter enough repeaters or frequencies so as to become comfortable with the procedure and will remember it when the time comes.
I started by just entering them in, and know how to do that now. Once the cable came I had to firgure out CHIRP but I think I got the hang of it. I need help testing my programming however as I don't have my license yet and can't transmit. I can receive just fine.
DaveK wrote: As far as organization is concerned, it is largely a matter of personal preference. In SoCal, there are lots of repeaters, usually named after the peak on which the transmitter is located. If call signs work better for you, then try that. If you have the software, it an easy matter to change names to suit your preference.

Good luck on the exam.
I think I'll start with names....that would be easier to remember. I've only programmed in a few(Keller, Palomar, and the Borregofest ones) so far and the NOAA channels. So far so good with the practice tests....going to do them every day till Borregofest to keep it fresh in my mind.

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Voodoo Blue 57
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Re: Programming in presets

#6

Post by Voodoo Blue 57 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 8:07 am

Most of the different radios we use have a corresponding yahoo user group. These groups have a wealth of knowledge including downloadable spreadsheets with repeater information for various cities and/or geographical areas. The beauty of the spreadsheets is you can see how other people configured their memory banks and you can decide how you want yours. Here is one for the Yaesu FT8800, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FT-8800R/ for instance.

Good luck on the test!
Phil

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taugust
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Re: Programming in presets

#7

Post by taugust » Sat Oct 13, 2012 4:35 pm

Other than one or two, I have mine programmed by freq. Names work for finding a repeater easily, but I prefer to know the freq. I use a cheat sheet, as you mentioned. It is a printout of a spreadsheet with memory location, freq., offset, PL, notes with name and location. I can reprogram with it if needed, or hand off to someone else to program their radio. I have the most used freqs and repeaters together in the lowest memory locations, and I have every repeater in the county programmed in. That way they are available if needed in a disaster or emergency. Don't count on being able to program after a disaster strikes, as you will be too busy.

I used to scan the memories to find active repeaters. Referring to the cheat sheet, you will soon learn which repeaters are active and what their freqs are.

Good luck on the test.
Tim
KG6WFV

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