Repeater Etiquette

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OLLIE
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Repeater Etiquette

#1

Post by OLLIE » Wed Mar 26, 2008 11:58 am

A friend of mine (I think it's safe to call him a friend) posted this on another forum and thought it was good stuff so here it is...
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Some good information on etiquette when using repeaters.

________________________________________________

Roundtables and "Turning it Over". When more than two amateurs are in a QSO, it is
often referred to as a "roundtable" discussion. Such a QSO usually goes in order from
amateur A to amateur B to amateur C and eventually back to amateur A again to
complete the roundtable. To keep everyone on the same page, when any one amateur is
done making a transmission, they "turn it over" to the next station in sequence (or out of
sequence, if so desired). Without turning it over to a particular station when there are
multiple stations in the QSO, nobody knows who is supposed to go next, and there ends
up either being dead silence or several stations talking at once. At the end of a
transmission, turn it over to the next station by naming them or giving their callsign, such
as "...and that's that. Go ahead Joe." or "....and that's that. Go ahead XYZ." If it's been
close to 10 minutes, it's a good time to identify at the same time as well, such as "...and
that's that. N3XYZ, go ahead Joe."

IDing and Who's Who? By FCC regulations, you must always identify at 10 minute
intervals and at the end of a transmission. If you are making a test transmission or calling
another party, this is a one-way transmission. Since it has no "length" as there is no QSO
taking place, you should identify each time you make a call or a test transmission. When
identifying yourself and another party (or parties), or when making a directed call, your
callsign goes LAST. "N3XYZ, K3ABC" means that K3ABC is calling N3XYZ, not the
other way around. There is no need to identify each time you make a transmission, only
once every 10 minutes. You do not need to identify the station with whom you are
speaking, only your own callsign, but it is generally polite to remember the call of the
other station. Avoid phonetics on FM unless there is a reason for using them, such as the
other station misunderstanding your callsign. When phonetics are needed, stick to the
standard phonetic alphabet.

Demonstrations. From time to time, an amateur may want to demonstrate the
capabilities of amateur radio to another non-amateur. The typical way to do this is to ask
for a "demo" such as "N3XYZ for a demonstration." Anyone who is listening to the
repeater can answer them back. Usually telling the calling party your name, callsign, and
location is what they are looking for, not a lengthy conversation. Someone doing a demo
may ask for stations in a particular area to show the range of amateur radio
communications, such as if the calling station is in the Poconos they may ask for any
stations in south Jersey or Harrisburg areas, which is more interesting than demonstrating
that they can talk to someone in the same town as they are in.

Signal Reports. If you are unsure how well you are making it into the repeater, DO NOT
kerchunk the repeater. Any time you key up the repeater, you should identify, even if you
are just testing to see if you are making the machine. "N3XYZ test" is sufficient. Do not
use the repeater as a "target" for tuning or aiming antennas, checking your transmitter
power, etc. Use a dummy load where appropriate, or test on a simplex frequency. If you
need someone to verify that you are making the repeater OK, ask for a signal report such
as "N3XYZ, can someone give me a signal report?" "Radio check" is a term most often
used on CB, "signal report" is what most amateurs ask for.

Language. Aside from some of the techno-syncracies inherent in amateur vernacular, use
plain conversational English. The kind of English that would be suitable for prime-time
television, not R rated movies. Avoid starting or encouraging conflicts on the air. If a
topic of conversation starts to draw strong debate, change the subject. Avoid "radio-ese"
lingo whenever possible. CB has its own language style and so does amateur radio, but
the two are not the same. Amateurs have "names", not "personals". Although many new
hams have graduated from the CB ranks, let's try to keep CB lingo off the amateur bands.
When visiting a new repeater, take some time to monitor before jumping in to get a feel
for the type of traffic and operating mannerisms of that particular system. Some repeaters
are very free-wheeling in that there are people jumping in and out of conversations
constantly. Others primarily have directed calls on them and discourage ragchewing.
Others are member-exclusive repeaters. Listen before you talk, when in Rome do as the
Romans do.

Emergencies. If there is a QSO going on, break into a conversation with the word
"Break" or "Break for priority traffic." DO NOT USE THE WORD BREAK TO JOIN IN
A QSO UNLESS THERE IS AN EMERGENCY! All stations should give immediate
priority any station with emergency traffic.

Malicious Interference. If there is malicious interference, such as kerchunking, touchtones,
rude comments, etc. DO NOT ACKNOWLEDGE IT! Continue the QSO in a
normal fashion. If the interference gets to the level where it is impossible to carry on the
QSO, simply end the QSO as you normally would.

Power. Use the minimum power necessary to complete a QSO. However, the minimum
power necessary doesn't just mean you are barely tickling the repeater receiver squelch. If
someone says that you are noisy, increase power or relocate or take whatever measures
you can to improve your signal. Continuing to make transmissions after being told your
signal is noisy is inconsiderate to those listening. The amateur radio manufacturers
continue to come up with newer, smaller handheld radios, many with power levels well
under a watt. Many new amateurs start out with a handheld radio as their "first rig".
Although convenient, they aren't the most effective radios in terms of performance.
Without a good external antenna, operating a handheld radio indoors or inside a car is
going to result in a lot of bad signal reports.


The following hyperlinks provide general information on good repeater operating
practices. We thank those groups/individuals for providing this information.
http://www.w2li.org/operatingpractices.htm#Special Notes - The Tri County Radio
Association W2LI
http://www.rars.org/repeater/rptrgide.htm - Raleigh Amateur Radio Society
"OLLIE"
(K6JYB)


APRS
K6JYB ("BugEater")
K6JYB-7 (VX-8R)


http://www.facebook.com/FJOllie

"Some people live an entire lifetime and wonder if they have ever made a difference in the world, the Marines don't have that problem."
-Ronald Reagan


CHECK OUT THE OUTDOOR ADVENTURE USA AMATEUR RADIO NET:
Every Thursday night at 7:30pm PST

Repeater
146.385+ PL: 146.2 Keller Peak (Echolink Equipped)

User avatar
Brucek
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2008 8:34 am
Call Sign: k6bjk
Location: Torrance, California

Re: Repeater Etiquette

#2

Post by Brucek » Fri Mar 28, 2008 8:27 am

Great post Ollie: I think we need to remember that as more and more people in the off-road community come over to Ham radio we should be aware that the test does not teach much about real life operations. Articles like this will help people become acquainted with good operating proceedures. More posts of this nature would be a good idea.
Bruce K
K6BJK

User avatar
OLLIE
OAUSA Board Member
Posts: 2693
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 7:31 am
Call Sign: K6JYB
Location: Sweet Home Alabama!!!

Re: Repeater Etiquette

#3

Post by OLLIE » Mon Apr 14, 2008 11:54 am

N6DTO wrote:The ID thing can also be very annoying. I have no problem with the 10Min FCC mandated interval, but some people have no idea of time.
We have a repeater here in SoCal that has a BOZO on it that must ID at the beginning of every transmission, at least twice during his transmission and again at the end of his transmission. He probably averages 200 or so ID's over a 10 min time frame. Very annoying!

Enough griping for now
73s
Great point... Too much is way annoying. I usually get wrapped up in conversation and forget to ID until I hear someone else do it. :D

I've heard of people setting timers that go off every ten minutes so they know when it's about time to ID.
"OLLIE"
(K6JYB)


APRS
K6JYB ("BugEater")
K6JYB-7 (VX-8R)


http://www.facebook.com/FJOllie

"Some people live an entire lifetime and wonder if they have ever made a difference in the world, the Marines don't have that problem."
-Ronald Reagan


CHECK OUT THE OUTDOOR ADVENTURE USA AMATEUR RADIO NET:
Every Thursday night at 7:30pm PST

Repeater
146.385+ PL: 146.2 Keller Peak (Echolink Equipped)

sdnative

Re: Repeater Etiquette

#4

Post by sdnative » Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:36 am

Ollie (K6JYB) wrote:A friend of mine (I think it's safe to call him a friend) posted this on another forum and thought it was good stuff so here it is...

Ollie,

Of course you can call me a friend!

BTW: I cant claim credit for this info. I borrowed it from somewhere else. :D


Eric

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