Trail First Aid Kit

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DaveK
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Trail First Aid Kit

#1

Post by DaveK » Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:32 pm

Over time I find that my needs for my first aid kit have changed. Recently, I upgraded the kit to include a much larger container and more equipment. I opted for a Pelican case due to its tight seal, durable construction and choice of colors. It also didn’t hurt that the Pelican factory is about a mile from my office. The current kit includes the following:

Ace Bandages
Adhesive Bandages, All Sizes
Alcohol Wipes
Antacids
Antibacterial soap
Antibiotics- Wide Spectrum
Aspirin
Asthma meds (when traveling with asthmatics)
Bactine
Bandage Scissors
Benadryl Dye Free Allergy
Betadine
Blankets
Blister pads
Burn Ointment
Cold packs
Cortizone ointment
Cotton swabs (Q-tips)
Dental floss
Duct Tape
Epipen - Auto-Injector
Eye droppers
Eyewash Solution - Visine
Fingernail Cutters
First Aid Manual
Gloves, Latex
Hot packs
Ibuprofen
Knee Brace, Elastic
Lip balm
Neosporin
Pepto Bismal
Razor or Sharp Knife
Razors, Shaving
Rolled Gauze
Snake Bite Kit (not sure about this though)
Sterile Gauze Pads
Sun Screen and sunburn lotion
Tape, Waterproof and Cloth
Tums
Tweezers
Tylenol

Most of these items have expiration dates, making it necessary to replace those whose expiration date has passed. Extreme heat can also adversely affect some items and I check them to determine their individual tolerance for heat.

I've thought about splints but don't know enough about which one to carry. Any one with some advice.

I know my list is not complete, so if you have suggestions for additional stuff, PLEASE POST!
DaveK
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toms
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#2

Post by toms » Thu Mar 20, 2008 9:08 pm

I would recommend you divide your first aid supplies up into separate sub pouches or bags, or areas etc. inside the main first aid kit so that it is more convenient to find the items you need. Here is my list: tool kit, medications, wound care, sprains & splints;

To splint a long bone you must immobilize the joint above and below the break. For a joint you should splint in a mid range position and limit movement. So if it is a tibia break both the knee and foot must be immobilize. 2 Tent poles and a tarp will do it. Most commercial splints are too bulky to carry. Our best plan is to improvise. However a SAM splint can be useful if properly fashioned Carry duck tape, cable ties, ace bandages, and large safety pins in the first aid kit to keep the splint in place. But never use duck tape directly on skin.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
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Badlands Off-Road
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#3

Post by DaveK » Thu Mar 20, 2008 10:29 pm

Tom:

1. can you recommend some good SAM splints;

2. I know you have attended and completed several first aid courses. Can you give us some idea of classes and courses to take. Red Cross, local colleges, books, etc.

3. Do you carry a snake bite kit and if so what is in it (other than snake shot). Is anti-venom a hospital use only deal?
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#4

Post by toms » Fri Mar 28, 2008 9:33 pm

You buy a SAM splint at REI or on line. It comes rolled up. The value of the SAM split is that it can be made ridge by the shape you put into it. It can also be molded to fit your need. Put around a neck it can serve as a neck collar but is not as good as the real deal. I would not rely on too heavey on them. Some of the best splints can be improvised from stuff you carry in the vehicle or have for camping. The Wilderness Medical Associates "Field Guide of Wilderness & Resuce Medicine give examples and has diagrams. It is about $20 directly from http://www.wildmed.com. I think I saw it on Amazon. Or take the course and they give you one. I try to carry my guide with me 7x24.

I have taken a lot of First Aid courses and most of the info is out of my head in 2 or 3 days - Until I took the Wilderness First Responder Course (WFR). This is a 72 hour class and it uses a body's systems approach to learning - much better retension. They now have a way to earn it in two 4 day blocks. At the end of 4 days you get Wilderness First Aid. You can then go straight thru or come back later for the last 4 days to become a "Woofer" (WFR). There are instructors all over the US. THe closest to us is John Jacobs in Idyllwild CA . He sometimes has a course at UCLA. I took my refesher form him last September over the Labor Day weekend. A very nice way to find 4 days together. I camped out right in the front yard of the School but used thier showers for about $15 per day. This class is an outdoor adventure in itsself. When I did my orginal certification it was at Crested Butte CO. We had entire days outdoors doing simulations.
Here is the contact info for John:
Adventure Risk Mangement
P.O. Box 1160
Idyllwild, CA 92549
951.659.4090
http://www.adventureriskmanagement.com/index.html
info@adventureriskmanagement.com
or go to http://www.wildmed.com to find someone else near you or someone who has more convienent dates.

I feel very strongly that everyone who is going spend time on outdoor adventures needs to have this class. You should find out when John is holding his classes this year and put it on your schedule so it gets done! I tell you you will be on the WFR band wagon when you finish the class too. It is that good.
You will be looking for people to save.

I do not carry a snake bite kit. They are not longer recommended. The slash and suck technique casues more harm then good. Also there is no need to kill the snake. All the antivenonims are the same for pit vipers.

Right from my guide:
Remove constricting articles
Clean and dress the wound (just like any other wound)
Mark edema to determine rate and amount of swelling (ie draw a line around it)
Walk pt. out if he is able (in our case we would drive the pt. out)
no need to kill the snake

BTW - In addition to my field guide I carry gloves, medical tape and an CPR mask almost all the time, even in town.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
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Badlands Off-Road
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#5

Post by DaveK » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:39 pm

"no need to kill the snake"

Tom, Tom, Tom. Allow me to suggest some "Needs":

1. hatband
2. belt
3. shoes
4. wallet
5. target practice.

But seriously. Is snake anti venom, a hospital use only thing. Is it available to carry on the trail? Is it wise to carry it, even if you could get it?
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#6

Post by DaveK » Mon Apr 07, 2008 10:54 pm

Tom:

Are you willing and able to personally offer a first aid course? If so when can we do it?

If not, do you know when any of these courses are being offered?
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#7

Post by toms » Wed Apr 09, 2008 7:34 am

Dave,

We saw a Mojave Green Rattlesnake this past Sunday on our Mojave Road Trail ride.
He was not a large one but he was not happy seeing us. They do not go looking for trouble but they will not retreat when provoked. I will have to post a picture or 2 when I get them from someone on the trip.

The Mojave Green is the most deadly snake we have in North America. It’s poison is 16 times more potent then the Sidewinder. It has both a neurotoxin and a hemotoxin. My understanding of the antivenin is that it is not a single shot but an IV drip for about 30 minutes and very expensive (a couple of hundred dollars). The antivenin is made horse or sheep reaction to venom from Mojave Green A plus 3 other pit vipers which neutralize the Mojave Green B. So it is not practical to carry the antivenin - not only do you need to keep it cool, run an IV but there is also the risk of anaphylactic reaction to horse products.
The reason you do not need to kill the snake is that the doctor only needs to know that it was a pit viper since there is only one antivenin

Teaching First Aid is not in my repertoire and I am not certified to teach first aid. Sign up for th WFR class.

The next Wilderness First Responder Class is at Idyllwild May 3 to May 11. This is an 8 day class. The cost is $595. Register on the web site: http://www.wildernessoutings.com/3course/firstaid.html or call 1-877-4wild-0ut (1-877-494-5368). You can take the first 4 days (5-3 to 5-6) and receive the Wilderness Advanced First Aid.

There is another class October 11th to October 19th with the same set up – first 4 days earns the Wilderness Advanced First aid and continue for the second four days and you get the Wilderness First Responder.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
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http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#8

Post by taugust » Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:47 pm

Someone on another forum posted this to add to your kit. I will be buying some soon. Also add a tourniquet or two. What we do can cause severe bleeding along way from help. This could save a life. Similar products are available and some are used by the military in Iraq and Afganistan.

http://www.bestglide.com/celox.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#9

Post by OLLIE » Wed Apr 16, 2008 6:29 pm

taugust wrote:Someone on another forum posted this to add to your kit. I will be buying some soon. Also add a tourniquet or two. What we do can cause severe bleeding along way from help. This could save a life. Similar products are available and some are used by the military in Iraq and Afganistan.

http://www.bestglide.com/celox.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Good stuff Tim. I forgot about that stuff. I'll be adding that to my emergency arsenal.
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Re: Trail First Aid Kit

#10

Post by eubi » Wed Apr 30, 2008 5:20 am

An Epipen is good if you have a history of allergic reaction and can get the prescription!

I always carry Benedryl antihistamine capsules or an equivalent. In case of a surprise allergic reaction, it can be empied out of the capsule and rubbed onto the roof of the victim's mouth. I have been told the antihistamine lasts longer than the "quick hit" an Epipen gives.

..and since we are in the backwoods, I also carry tick pliers and a baggie. It's a good idea to pull out the tick and keep it in the baggie. No more dousing the tick in oil or touching it with a hot match. This causes the tick to vomit its stomach contents (your blood and who knows what else) into you before he backs out. :o

Watch the bite site for signs of infection or lyme disease. If you see bull's eye pattern developing, go the the doctor and take the tick! I doubt if the tick will need a copay. :D

Oh, and on the topic of Sam Splints, I feel they are very good, especially for lower arm or wrist breaks. They can be molded to the arm and held in place with vet wrap. Oh, but be sure you mold it to your arm before applying it to the victim. If you mold it to the victim's arm, you may suffer temporary hearing loss.
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