OAUSA Net –1-30 & 2-6, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

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OAUSA Net –1-30 & 2-6, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#1

Post by toms » Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:04 pm

This week the topic is vehicle recovery which was postponed from Jan 30, 2020 due to storm and snow issues with the repeater.

Recovery situations are some of the highest risk operations we perform off-road. All the tools we use are dangerous and potentially lethal. Winches in particular deserve a great deal of respect.

We can discuss the use of recovery straps, jacks, and winching.
Most of us use our winch and other equipment very infrequently. This is an opportunity to refresh our knowledge.
We can discuss safety, gear, riggings, techniques, new trends, and other issues.

Post your questions.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
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Re: OAUSA Net –January 30, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#2

Post by toms » Mon Jan 27, 2020 7:27 pm

Trends

1. This one goes by many names. The industry has not settled on a common name.

Winch recovery Ring
Snatch ring
Soft shackle pulley
Donut pulley

The primary sales pitch is the weight savings vs. a traditional standing leg metal pulley. A typical 16,000 LB metal pulley weights about 6 LB. vs 21oz.
I have seen arguments that is safer if the line breaks since it weighs so much less. Still not something I would like to hit me.
It can only be used with synthetic winch rope and a soft shackle.

This one made by Factor 55 is representative of the concept. They call it the Rope Retention Pulley.
So far they are the only ones to add the little rubber fingers to keep the rope in the ring when slack.
It
20200127_120538.jpg
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From the Factor 55 web site
"The world’s first winch friction pulley with patented rope retention feature. A lightweight alternative to traditional heavy snatch blocks/pulleys. The RRP can be used to increase pulling power or redirect the winch line. The RRP is for use with SYNTHETIC ROPE ONLY and is to be used in conjunction with a soft shackle. During momentary slack, patented rope retention rubber fingers prevent synthetic winch rope from escaping the pulley groove preventing premature rope failure. The over sized hole radius provides a smooth rubbing surface and keeps the legs of the soft shackle from rubbing on the edges of the RRP. The critical friction surface has also been TEFLON treated to increase slickness and heat dissipation.

For Synthetic Rope Diameters 5/16 to 1/2 inch (8-12mm)
Billet machined 6000 series aluminum
Mil-A-8625 F Hard Anodized Surface
WLL 22,000 pounds (97.9 KN)
Weight: 21 ounces (595 g)
Made In The USA
Typical rigging for winch ring 1-1.jpg
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We ran a test to see how much the friction affected the load on the winch. I did not test for heat issues.

We set up a double line pull between a vehicle and a tree. However, we anchored the rear of the vehicle to a stump so it could not move.
we ran the load on the winch side up to 8000 pounds. We did this for the winch ring and for a standard standing leg metal pulley.

We placed two load cell in the line by using an extension rope. One load cell measured the load the winch pulled and the other measured the load on the other leg of the double line pull.

In round numbers we saw an increase of 300 pounds on the winch side with a standard pulley and 1000 pounds with the winch ring. When the winch was stopped, the load became equal on both lines regardless of which pulley we used.

The 300 LB. and 1000 LB. readings represent the resistance the pulleys added. It also confirmed, our rule-of-thumb of adding about 10% of the load for each pulley in the rigging. The 10% rule-of-thumb was developed with steel cable and arrears to be on the high side with synthetic rope.
Keep in mind, all out testing was in the field with somewhat rough measures but adequate in my opinion for "rule-of-thumb".

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2. Solving an Old Issue

First we need to understand the strength and loading issues of the screw pin bow shackle commonly used in recovery.

The standard 3/4 inch screw pin bow shackle is rated at SLL (safe load limit) of 4.7 tons. That is about 9500 pounds. In addition the standard for minimum breaking strength is required to be at least 5 times the SLL (works out to 47,500). That is your safety margin 5 to 1. Many manufactures actually exceed this requirement in actual production. You can purchase (for a price) 3/4 inch screw pin bow shackles that are rated for higher SLL.
In practice, a standard-rated properly rigged screw pin bow shackle exceeds by a wide margin the weak link in the rigging. The weak link is almost always the line.
shackle_side_load_chartandillustration-1.jpg
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As seen in the picture, you have the full rating of the shackle when pulling in a straight line on the bow. If you pull at a 45 degree angle you have only 70% of the strength (lose 30%). And while the illustration lists pulling on the side retains 50%, we never recommend setting up such a rigging.

A winch hook is happiest when it can center itself on the bow of a screw pin bow shackle because it self centers. Loops of a tree strap are happiest when they can ride on the bow of the shackle. If you are using a hook, you sometimes have to make the decision to place the hook on the 3/4 inch pin. The result is it will pull into the corner.

Shackle & hook2-2.jpg
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Several companies have solved this by make winch safety stoppers that replace the hook on the end of the thimble on the winch line. The design incorporates a block that fills most of the space between the sides of the shackle.

Shackle & Flat Link winch safety stopper-1.jpg
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This particular one is Factor 55 Flat Link with their Rock Guard in place to protect the synthetic line.
Factor 55 Flat Link -1.jpg
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When you have a synthetic winch line the best place to store the line is completely inside on the drum to protect it from cuts. A winch stopper allows you to do this and in the case of the Factor 55 Flat link it folds flat up against the winch, it is "fat" to fill a shackle, and the hole in it is cut so the big ends of a shackle will go through if the other attachment point requires the pin.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. ARB TRED
ARB Tred.jpg
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This is ARB's entry into the market. Max Trax is another perhaps more well known brand.

In my opinion, these are only useful if you are shallowly stuck as in the picture below. If you are buried to the axle, they are less effective.
To work the tire needs to grab the ramp and that can be difficult if it is not well under the tire or the angle is too steep.
ARB is addressing the issue of the tire not grabbing and wearing down the entry "teeth." I have not tested these yet.

From the ARB web site
TRED is the ultimate all-in-one off-road recovery device, specially designed to get your four-wheel drive, ATV and equipment out of trouble when traction is lost in sand, mud, sludge, or snow.

With a designated shovel feature, extreme hex grip nodules, aggressive ramp entry teeth and ultimate wear resistant properties, TRED will allow you to explore with confidence.

TRED eliminates the hazardous practices of other vehicle recovery options involving highly stressed components such as steel cables, shackles, snatch straps and winches, keeping you, your family and your vehicle safe.
List Price: List: $199.99 ; Dimension (inch) & Weight (lb):42.52”L x 12.48”W x 2.87”H 4.13”H (Nested/Stacked Pair) & 13.98lbs Packaged

ARB Tred 2.jpg
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Features & Benefits:
• Perfect for fast, solo recoveries
• Extreme hex grip nodules along entire length of the board
• Aggressive ramp entry teeth to grab tires quickly, minimizing chance of wheel spin
• Ultimate wear resistant properties
• Unique nylon material for superior flex and durability
• Low profile for stacking and storage
• Retro fit mounts to suit most recovery board mounting options
• Ergonomic handles for shovel control
• Made by four-wheel drivers for four-wheel drivers
• The world’s first non-mechanical off-road recovery device to boast a lifetime warranty
• Various different colors available
• Also available is the shorter TRED 800, and the premium TRED Pro model
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: OAUSA Net –January 30, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#3

Post by toms » Mon Jan 27, 2020 8:35 pm

Load Cell

I am using a 20,000 pound load cell.

Load Cell-1.jpg
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This is from one of our experiments. The numbers did not show up well in photographs and it was difficult to show the rigging and the the readouts in one photo. I believe the numbers are 8653 and 4480 - difference is 307. This was a test to show the load on the winch line was about 1/2 the load on the tree. The 307 is pulley resistance. It was difficult to tell when we hit out load and were still pulling vs just holding.

Readout Load Cell -1.jpg
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See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: OAUSA Net –January 30, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#4

Post by toms » Wed Jan 29, 2020 10:02 am

Recovery Strap wound around wheel

This is a self-recovery solution. It requires an anchor directly in line with the strap.
Good solutions for the anchor is to bury your spare tire or use a pull pal.

If you bury your spare tire, bury it standing up and completely blow ground level. Dig a trench for the strap to avoid pulling the tire out of the ground.
Dig the hole 1.5 times the height of the tire (With a 35” tire, hole should be 52.5” deep or deeper)
Dig a channel for the strap to exit out of the hole in a straight line towards the vehicle as shown in picture

  • You may or may not need an axle locker on. I have been successful without one.
  • Plan to drive exactly down the strap
  • Stay back in case strap slips off wheel
  • Turning the steering wheel even slightly will cause strap to slip off.
  • Use rear wheel when possible;
  • Minimum of one wrap on the wheel before you start taking weight
  • Use blanket
Strap on wheel.jpg
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Bury the tire.jpg
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See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: OAUSA Net –January 30, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#5

Post by toms » Wed Jan 29, 2020 11:01 am

Recovery Straps and Ropes Safety

1. Do not use a strap that has hooks sewn into the ends. In the event the strap / rope breaks the hook will recoil with the strap. The hook becomes a lethal flying missile.

2. Use straps and ropes with loops on each end.

3. Straps/ ropes are designed to be used with the connection through the loop. Techniques such as using a knot to tie it on, weakens the strap up to 50%. Additionally you will not be able to undo the knot after the tremendous forces exerted on the rope. Looping it over the edge of a bumper that is even ¼ inch thick is equally bad. The strap will be quickly cut.
4. Put your foot on the line if you need to cross a line not under tension. Once both end are connected it is consider a “live” line. If it is lying on the ground and you need to cross it, put your foot on the strap. In the event the rope is pulled taught, it will throw you off.

5. Never step over or straddle a strap or rope under tension. Walk all the way around.

6. Be sure everyone is well clear before doing the recovery.

7. Drape a blanket over the strap or rope (called a “parachute”). In the event the line breaks the blanket will dampen the recoil.

8. Do not place the loop on to a tow ball. The tow ball is not rated for recovery and should it break you have a “cannon” ball flying at you.

9. Do not use the hook hanging out of the winch as a tow point. The winch brake is not strong enough to resist the force of a strap/ rope recovery and you will just pull the winch line off the spool.

10. Do not connect two straps / ropes together with a bow shackle in the middle. In the event the straps / ropes the bow shackle becomes a deadly missile.

11. Discard any strap that has nicks or frays.
Straps and Ropes-1.jpg
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The flat strap is ready to be retired. Too many frays. The red line with the sewn hook is a bad strap. If it breaks the strap recoils with the strap.
The K-rope (kinetic energy recovery rope) is a 1" x 30 feet rated MBS of 33,500.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: OAUSA Net –January 30, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#6

Post by toms » Wed Jan 29, 2020 11:02 am

Hi-Lift Jack Safety
Summary

1. Inspect the Jack carefully before each use. Make sure the Jack is not damaged, badly worn, or missing parts. Check the climbing pins to make sure that they are not worn or damaged. Check the steel standard (bar) to make sure that it is straight and that nothing is blocking the holes.

2. Jack is not self-lubricating. It will not operate safely without proper lubrication.

3. You must chock and block (stabilize) the load to prevent it from moving or falling. If a raised load falls, it can cause serious injury or death. Make sure the load cannot slip, roll away, or fall.

4. Do not use this Jack on curved or tubular vehicle bumpers. The vehicle could slip off the Jack and fall, causing serious injury or death.

5. Always place the handle against the steel standard (bar) with the handle clip holding it up before moving the reversing latch. This will prevent the handle from moving up and down rapidly, which could cause serious injury or death if it comes into contact with any part of your body. Always keep your head out of the travel path of the handle.

6. Lowering the load can be dangerous. Keep your head clear of the path of the handle. During lowering, the weight of the load pushes UP against the Jack's handle. If your hands slip off the handle, or if the handle is horizontal when you move the reversing latch, it may move up very quickly. If your head is in the handle's travel path, it could strike you, causing serious injury or death.

7. The working load of each chain or tow strap must be greater than the strength of the Jack. If a chain or tow strap breaks while winching, the load could shift or the chain or tow strap could snap back. When used as a winch, the top clamp will support up to 5,000 lbs.

8. The maximum clamping force is 750 lbs. If you exceed this limit, the top clamp could bend or break, resulting in injury or damage.

9. Never get under a raised load without properly chocking and supporting the load. If a raised load falls it can cause serious injury or death.

10. Keep the handle against the steel standard (bar) with the handle clip holding it when not lifting or lowering.

11. Never go underneath a raised load supported with just a Jack.

12. The Jack must have a load on it (150 pounds or more) to lower step-by-step. Otherwise, the lifting mechanism will slide down to the base plate, "dropping" your load.

The most important thing to remember is a solid base for the jack, a solid lifting point and keep your head away from the handle travel path.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: OAUSA Net –January 30, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#7

Post by toms » Wed Jan 29, 2020 11:03 am

Winching Safety

The use of a winch is risky, dangerous and potential lethal. Learn to use your winch safely. Use only “rated” hardware and follow these safety rules!
Safe Operation - Basics
• Wear heavy leather gloves that are loose fitting
• Be sure everyone is well clear – danger “V” & avoid the spiders web
• Inspect winch & line. Do not use a cable with kinked, broken, crushed or frayed strands
• Never step over or straddle a winch cable under tension
• Put your foot on the line if you need to cross a line not under tension
• Walk the line – do not let it slide through your hands
• Stay an arm length or more away from the fairlead
• Use prusik knot to add a safety line
Stuck Assessment
• Take your time to assess the force required to over come the stuck
• Assess lay of the land, broken vehicle components, & obstacles
• Never exceed the rated capacity of the winch & winch line
• Use a pulley to reduce the load on the on each leg of the winch line
Rigging
• Use hand signal with an assistant
• Never use the winch as a tow strap
• Do not use winch for lowering or supporting a person
• Make sure the anchor is secure
• Never hook the winch back on itself
• Use a strap to protect the tree
• Do not hook on to a tow ball
• Try for straight pull for the winch & not at an angle to avoid cable pile up
• Uncoil 85 -95 % of the cable every time to avoid “log splitting”
• Keep at least 5 wraps on the drum (8 wraps for UHMWPE rope)
• Drape a blanket over cable (called a “parachute”)
• Route the winch controller cable away from moving parts
• Connect the winch hook with the open side up – “hook up”.
• Check all rigging components with a light tension on the line before pulling
Winching
• Keep the engine running while winching; best to winch from inside vehicle
• Take automatic transmissions out of park if stationary
• Plug in remote only when operating the winch
• Do not let the cable build up on one side – Try to make straight lines pulls.
• Do not over take winch speed – no spikes in load on winch line!
• Have the stuck vehicle assist with the pull but do not over drive the winch
• Use the brakes or chock to keep winching vehicle in place. Take it out of park.
• Do not let the winch cable slide along sharp objects
• Make sure recovered vehicle is secure before releasing rigging.
Wrap up
• Rewind winch with neat wraps under tension
• Repair any environmental damage. Remove spilled fluids.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: OAUSA Net –January 30, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#8

Post by toms » Wed Jan 29, 2020 11:05 am

Bushranger – Exhaust X Jack
1. Place jack far enough under the vehicle so it will “pop’ out.
2. Warn spectators of the possibility of the jack popping out and not to stand directly opposite it.
3. Protect the top of the jack against heat and sharp edges. Extra protection is always warranted.
4. Make a smooth curve out of the hose. Do not allow any kinks. They become ot spots and may melt through.
5. When running hard on sand, the vehicle exhaust cool for an hour before using it on the X jack. Or use another vehicle with a cooler engine.
6. The jack works on volume not pressure. It will start venting pressure at about 8 psi.
7. You must chock and block (stabilize) the load to prevent it from moving or falling. If a raised load falls, it can cause serious injury or death. Make sure the load cannot slip, roll away, or fall.
8. Never get under a raised load without properly chocking and supporting the load. If a raised load falls it can cause serious injury or death.
9. On a gasoline engine, you may need to increase the RPM to get the bag to lift the load to the final height of the bag. Have someone else, increase the RPM.
10. Even on a straight tail pipe you will need to hold the funnel on with a great deal of force and squeeze it to seal the exhaust.
X-Jack.jpg
X-Jack.jpg (327.58 KiB) Viewed 376 times
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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Re: OAUSA Net –1-30 & 2-6, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#9

Post by DaveK » Wed Feb 05, 2020 5:27 pm

BUMP!!!
DaveK
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Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.
Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.

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Re: OAUSA Net –1-30 & 2-6, 2020 – Vehicle Recovery

#10

Post by k9atk » Thu Feb 06, 2020 6:02 pm

Please check in
K9atk brian
K9fog trish
Kd0exi cheyenne
Kd0rha tyler
Kd0gpe austin
Lets hope keller is up and running

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