OAUSA Net - 09/24/20 – Situational 10 Essentials

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OAUSA Net - 09/24/20 – Situational 10 Essentials

#1

Post by toms » Mon Sep 21, 2020 11:27 am

Situational 10 Essentials

Most of us are aware of the basic 10 essentials for wilderness survival. In an ideal situation we can carry all but the heaviest and bulkiest of these 10 items in our pockets.

For our net this week we want to explore other situations, where our wilderness essentials are not the right tools and situations that are difficult to carry what we deem as essential. For example, the office, flying, court house, cocktail party, etc.

What situations can you envision and how would you adjust your 10 essentials? Post up ideas, pictures, techniques, and hacks.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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10 Essentials - History

#2

Post by Jeff-OAUSA » Mon Sep 21, 2020 8:37 pm

The Ten Essentials are survival items that outdoor-oriented and Scouting organizations recommend for safe travel in the backcountry.

The term Ten Essentials is reported to have first appeared in print in the third edition of Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills (January 1974): however many of us may recall similar lists from our experiences in Boy Scouts.

I was an Eagle Scout by 1974 and my personal recollection is hearing and using the term "Ten Essentials" in my Scouting and personal camping and backpacking activities long before 1974, including a 250 mile jaunt with a couple of friends in the Summer of 1973. The point is not to suggest Mountaineering wasn't the first to use the term in a publication, but rather to underscore that the concept of carrying some basic items to assist with survival in the wilderness while out hiking, camping, or hunting was not new in 1974, so while the formal name may have been coined in the 1974 publication, the concept of basic essential gear was not new at all.

Many organizations and authors recommend that hikers, backpackers, climbers, hunters, and other outdoor enthusiasts rigorously ensure they have the Ten Essentials with them.

So why the "Ten Essentials" and not the "Twelve Essentials"? The lists for the most part were never intended to be limited to precisely ten items. I believe ten was used to focus the outdoors person on getting down to the basic essentials for survival, whether that list be 8, 10, or 12 items or some other number. The key is that personal preferences and differences in conditions may dictate more or less than 10 items and with experience most experienced adventurers add and subtract from the list depending on the situation. Some ultralight backpackers do not always carry all of the items and believe it is an acceptable risk they take in order to travel light and fast.

Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten_Essentials

The concept of the Ten Essentials applies outside the camping, hiking, trekking, backpacking and hunting worlds: the concepts of the "10Es" apply equally well to other situations where survival could be an issue and survival enhanced if certain equipment were on hand, for example, offroading, suburban/urban life, office work, airline travel, and roadtrips. Tonight, we'll talk about what might be on the Ten Essentials list for various situations, e.g., Situational Ten Essentials.
Last edited by Jeff-OAUSA on Tue Sep 22, 2020 6:44 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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10 Essentials - Boy Scouts of America

#3

Post by Jeff-OAUSA » Mon Sep 21, 2020 8:38 pm

THE SCOUT OUTDOOR ESSENTIALS

In looking over some Scouting documents, it looks like the BSA refers to the Ten Essentials as "The Scout Outdoor Essentials". I'd be interested in hearing from anyone that has a specific example of where an official Boy Scouts of America publication refers to the term "Ten Essentials".

According to the BSA, they’re called “essentials” for a reason. Every packing list starts with these 10 items.

1. A pocketknife or multitool can be handy in a wide variety of situations. It’s useful for tasks as large as building an emergency shelter or lighting a campfire with poor fuel, or as small as repairing a damaged backpack. Keep you knife sharp and clean.

2. A first-aid kit can be a lifesaver. Literally. A few items will allow you to treat scratches, blisters and other minor injuries. They should also allow you to provide initial care while waiting for help for more serious injuries.

3. Bring extra clothing to match the weather. Multiple layers are better than a single massive jacket, because layered clothing is adaptable to a wide range of temperatures.

4. Rain gear is very important. Rain can come in a hurry, and getting your clothes drenched is more than just uncomfortable, it can lead to hypothermia, a potentially fatal condition.

5. A flashlight, headlamp or a rugged penlight is important for finding your way in the dark. Bring extra batteries, too.

6. Trail food is good for maintaining your energy. Bring more than you think you’ll need in case you get stuck (or lost) in the woods.

7. Water can prevent dehydration, heat exhaustion and heatstroke. Use a lightweight, unbreakable container with a secure lid.

8. Matches and/or a fire starter may be used to light fires for heat, or for signaling for help. Store matches or lighters in resealable plastic bags.

9. Sun protection might include sunblock, sunglasses, lip balm and a wide-brimmed hat.

10. A map and compass are probably the most important tools you can carry in case you get lost.

Reference: https://boyslife.org/outdoors/outdoorar ... checklist/

The BSA list is a pretty good one, and like several of the others, is a good starting point for building a Situational Ten Essentials List by adding, replacing, or deleting based on the survival needs applicable to your particular situation.

The "canned" "Ten Essentials" lists are helpful, particularly if you are just staring out and the list comes from a trusted source that is representative of the situation you intend to enter into. For newbies to a particular situation, consider using the published list that best fits your particular situation, and hold off on modifying that list until you have gained some experience and have a good handle on what you may or may not need in a range of survival situations.
Last edited by Jeff-OAUSA on Thu Sep 24, 2020 7:31 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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10 Essentials - Mountaineers.Org

#4

Post by Jeff-OAUSA » Mon Sep 21, 2020 8:39 pm

The Ten Essentials list first appeared in the third edition of Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills, released in 1974 by Mountaineers Books.

The origin of the Ten Essentials dates back to climbing courses in the 1930s, and the purpose has always been to answer two basic questions:

1. Can you respond positively to an accident or emergency?
2. Can you safely spend a night (or more) outside?

Certain equipment deserves space in every pack. Mountaineers will not need every item on every trip, but essential equipment can be a lifesaver in an emergency. Exactly how much equipment “insurance” should be carried is a matter of healthy debate.

Some minimalists argue that weighing down a pack with such items causes people to move slower, making it more likely they will get caught by a storm or nightfall and be forced to bivouac. “Go fast and light. Carry bivy gear, and you will bivy,” they argue. The other side of this debate is that, even without the extra weight of bivy gear, a group may still be forced to bivouac. Each party must determine what will keep them safe.

Most members of The Mountaineers take along carefully selected items to survive the unexpected. Whatever your approach to equipment, a checklist will help you remember what to bring.

Over time, the Ten Essentials list has evolved from a list of individual items to a list of functional systems.

TEN ESSENTIALS: THE CLASSIC LIST
1. Map
2. Compass
2. Sunglasses and sunscreen
4. Extra clothing
5. Headlamp or flashlight
6. First-aid supplies
7. Firestarter
8. Matches
9. Knife
10. Extra food

TEN ESSENTIALS: FREEDOM 9 SYSTEMS
1. Navigation: Map, altimeter, compass, [GPS device], [PLB or satellite communicators], [extra batteries or battery pack]
2. Headlamp: Plus extra batteries
3. Sun protection: Sunglasses, sun-protective clothes, and sunscreen
4. First aid: Including foot care and insect repellent (if required)
5. Knife: Plus repair kit
6. Fire: Matches, lighter and tinder, or stove as appropriate
7. Shelter: Carried at all times (can be light emergency bivy)
8. Extra food: Beyond minimum expectation
9. Extra water: Beyond minimum expectation, or the means to purify
10. Extra clothes: Beyond minimum expectation

The Ten Essentials is a guide that should be tailored to the nature of the trip. Weather, remoteness from help, the size of the group and redundancy within the group, and complexity of the trip should be factored into the selected essentials. The first seven essentials tend to be compact and vary little from trip to trip, and so they can be grouped together to facilitate packing. Add the proper extra food, water, and clothes, and you’re ready to go. This brief list is intended to be easy to remember and serve as a mental pre-trip checklist.

The book, Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills,, is available here:https://www.mountaineers.org/books/book ... -edition-1
The fact that this is the 9th edition of the book speaks to its value and importance.

Reference: https://www.mountaineers.org/blog/what- ... essentials
Last edited by Jeff-OAUSA on Tue Sep 22, 2020 7:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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10 Essentials - U.S. Park Service

#5

Post by Jeff-OAUSA » Mon Sep 21, 2020 8:39 pm

Ten Essentials
Heading out to a national park? Make sure you pack the 10 Essentials!

The 10 Essentials are a collection of first aid and emergency items that can help you in the event of minor injuries, sudden weather changes, or unexpected delays. The 10 Essentials are only the basic items you should have with you. You may need additional items depending on the activity in which you participate (e.g. life jacket, bug spray, personal locator beacon). Visit the park's website to learn more about the park and your activity before you head out.

THE TEN ESSENTIALS

The 10 Essentials are organized into ten categories, or systems. The "systems" approach to the Ten Essentials is helpful in that it helps convey that a particular survival need may require more than one item to be effective. For example, a map without a compass is less useful than a map and compass together, so rather than list Map and Compass as two items, the concept of "Navigation" implies both map and compass and maybe even a GPS working together as a system can enhance survivability of some situations.

1. NAVIGATION – Map, compass, and GPS system
Navigation systems are used when planning your route before your trip, and when you need help orienting yourself in your surroundings during your activity. Know how to use a topographical or relief map as well as your compass or GPS unit before going out.

2. SUN PROTECTION – Sunglasses, sunscreen, and hat
Sun protection is necessary to protect your skin and eyes against harsh UV rays that are responsible for sunburns and skin cancer. Consider using sunglasses, sunscreen, and hats. Sun-protection clothing such as pants and long sleeve shirts can also help minimize your exposure to the sun.

3. INSULATION – Jacket, hat, gloves, rain shell, and thermal underwear
Nature is unpredictable. Be prepared for sudden changes in weather conditions. Pack an extra layer of clothing that reflects the most extreme conditions you could encounter.

4. ILLUMINATION – Flashlight, lanterns, and headlamp
Lighting is indispensable in the outdoors where no conventional light sources can be found. Items include flashlights, lanterns, and headlamps. Headlamps are the preferred light source because they are hands-free. Be sure to pack extra batteries.

5. FIRST-AID SUPPLIES – First Aid Kit
Be prepared for emergencies by packing first-aid supplies with you. Start with a pre-made kit and modify it to fit your trip and your medical needs. Check the expiration date on all items and replace them as needed. Consider including an emergency guide in case you are faced with an unfamiliar medical emergency.

6. FIRE – Matches, lighter and fire starters
Fire can be an emergency signal and a heat source for cooking and staying warm. Pack matches (preferably waterproof) and fire starters - items that catch fire quickly and sustain a flame (e.g. lighter). Familiarize yourself with the fire use regulations of your park before heading out. Learn more about campfires.

7. REPAIR KIT AND TOOLS – Duct tape, knife, screwdriver, and scissors
Carry a basic repair kit with you to help repair equipment. The kit should include items such as duct tape, a knife, and scissors. Consider packing a multi-tool, a compact version of many tools that can include a knife, screwdriver, can opener, etc. Be sure to bring any tools specific to your trip and your activity.

8. NUTRITION - Food
You should always be prepared for the possibility of changes to your trip plans. Pack an extra day's supply of food, preferably no-cook items that have good nutritional value in order to keep your energy high. Salty and easy to digest snacks (e.g. trail mix, nuts, and granola bars) work well for outdoor activities.

9. HYDRATION – Water and water treatment supplies
Staying hydrated on your trip is of utmost importance! Physical activity increases your risk of dehydration (loss of water and salts from the body), which can lead to negative health consequences. If you’re active outdoors (hiking, biking, running, swimming, etc.), especially in hot weather, you should drink water often and before you feel thirsty. Prepare your water before you need it and do not allow yourself to become dehydrated. Before heading out on your trip, be sure to identify if there are any bodies of water at your destination that you could collect water from and treat using your water treatment supplies. Learn more about purifying water.

10. EMERGENCY SHELTER – Tent, space blanket, tarp, and bivy
Shelter is one of the most important elements during an emergency survival situation. It can protect you from severe weather conditions and exposure to the elements. A tent, tarp, bivy sack, or emergency space blanket are all light weight options for emergency shelter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4cKXkTbYhY


Reference: https://www.nps.gov/articles/10essentials.htm
Last edited by Jeff-OAUSA on Mon Sep 21, 2020 9:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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10 Essentials - Offroaders.com

#6

Post by Jeff-OAUSA » Mon Sep 21, 2020 8:41 pm

The folks at Offroaders.com present extensive lists of thing to consider carrying when going offroad. The lists are very extensive, and in my view, go beyond tonight's discussion of the Ten Essentials. Don't get me wrong, their lists are great, but are more of a trip packing list than an emergency Ten Essentials list.

The Basic, Minimal Offroad Checklist

The minimal list is the basics that you should always carry in your vehicle when offroad. These items are good to have in the vehicle at all times.

1. First Aid Kit (Safety and Survival)
2. Basic Personal Essentials (water, food)
3. Spare Tire, Full Size
4. Jack and tire iron to change your tire
5. Tow strap
6. Tree saver
7. Come-alongs
8. Basic Tool Kit
9. Spare Key for vehicle

This basic list expands substantially, and assumes that one is traveling offroad in a vehicle, and perhaps a BIG vehicle at that. Let's look at some of the details.

1. First Aid Kit (Safety and Survival)
The First Aid Kit
First aid kits come in many shapes and sizes. You can buy them, or you can make your own kit. Whether you buy a first aid kit or put one together, make sure it has all the items you may need. Include any personal items, such as medications.
Here are suggestions for the contents of a first aid kit:

Activated Charcoal (use only if instructed by Poison Control Center)
Adhesive Tape
Antiseptic Ointment, Alcohol swabs, individually wrapped
Band-Aids (assorted sizes), Gauze Pads and Roller Gauze (assorted sizes), Triangular Bandage
Blanket, Disposable emergency blanket
Instant Cold pack, Instant Hot pack
Disposable Gloves
Hand Cleaner
Plastic Bags
Scissors and Tweezers
Small Flashlight and Extra Batteries
Syrup of Ipecac (use only if instructed by Poison Control Center)
Burnaid gel
Snake Bite kit
Medications: Anti-diarrhea medication, Tylenol ( fever reducer), Ibuprofen (Nuprin, Motrin, Advil) inflammation reduction, sprains bruises, etc, Benadryl for mild allergic reactions, Epinephrine in the form of an Epi Pen to treat more serious allergic reactions.

Safety Items

Safety Glasses
Leather Gloves
Fire Extinguisher – Should be mounted in the vehicle in an easily accessible location.
Flares
Tarp
flashlights
matches / lighter

2. Basic Personal Essentials (water, food)

Water – At least one Gallon per person, per day if not more. Drier, hotter climates may require more. Remember: Alcohol doesn’t hydrate. In fact alcoholic beverages dehydrate since it take more water to metabolize alcohol than the beverage contains. Plus it may cause you to require the above mentioned First Aid Kit.
Food – Bring food for twice the amount of time you are planning on being gone. Should you be delayed and have to spend a night out on the trail, you wont have to worry about going hungry. Good ideas for trail food: trail mix, beef jerky, fruits, dry/canned food, etc.
Extra Cloths – Nobody likes to sit in wet cloths or an extended period of time.
Personal items – This includes toilet paper, anti- microbial hand cleaner, etc
Sun block
Rain Jacket
Communication devices – Cell Phone, CB Radio, GMRS/FRS radios
Power inverter if necessary (e.g. Cell phone recharger, battery recharger for communication devices and camera)
Trash bags
– Keep your trails clean
Maps, information about the area
Compass or GPS
Water purification tablets

Survival – Seasonal Specific

Winter
Extra clothing
Warm outer layers (jacket, wind breaker)
Head gear (warm hat, hooded jacket)
Emergency blanket (compact survival type)

Summer
Sun Block
Insect repellant
Sunglasses

3. Spare Tire, Full Size; 4. Jack and tire iron to change your tire; 5. Tow strap; 6. Tree saver; 7. Come-alongs
Recovery Items

Hilift Jack
Tow straps – 2 or more, 2 inch width or wider, 20 foot or longer
Tree saver
Come-along (one or more)
D-rings, Shackles
Shovel
Chainsaw and bar oil, 2 cycle engine oil, spare chain (can be handy in recover situations, as well as for trail clearing on wooded trails)
Winch Kit: tree strap, hi-lift jack, snatch block, pickle fork, shackle, gloves
Pullpal
Snow tire chains (if tires don’t cut it)

8. Basic Tool Kit

Basic Tools
Basic tools are the versatile, essential tool sets that consist of a variety of sizes and combinations of commonly used tools such as socket sets, wrench sets, Allen wrenches, Torx sets and screw drivers. Your tool sets should cover the variety of sizes found in your vehicle. Regardless of whether your vehicle is American made or an import 4×4, when it comes to socket sets and wrenches, it’s sometimes wise to carry standard and metric socket since sometimes there are a mix of both standard and metric on custom vehicles not to mention helping a fellow 4wheeler.

Complete Socket Set with SAE (standard) and Metric with 3/8″ and 1/2″ drives. Deep and standard sockets.
Crescent, open end combination box wrenches SAE (standard) and Metric
Allen Wrenches
Torx sockets (especially if you own a Jeep)
Standard & Phillips screwdrivers, large, medium, small

Versatile Tools
Versatile tools are those that have many uses.

Large Hammer (a.k.a. the “BFH”)
Pliers (various sizes)
Needle Nose Pliers
Vice Grips, various sizes
Large channel-lock Pliers
Pipe wrenches – having 2 medium of these can be useful for tie-rods.
Utility knife or razor blades
Crescent wrenches (medium & large)
A BIG pry bar or length of strong metal pipe, inside diameter of pipe large enough to slip over a wrench or socket drive for extra leverage.
Magnet

Specialty Tools

Snap ring pliers
Air Pressure Gauge
Portable air pump
Jumper cables

Additional Items

Versatile Items

Duct Tape
Bailing wire
wood blocks – Useful as chock blocks, jacking platforms, ramps, suspension supports (for broken torsion bars)
Bungee cords, several in multiple sizes – good for securing gear, temporary repairs, etc.
Rope lengths
Super glue
Epoxy
Tie wraps
rags
Work Gloves, leather

The list at Offroaders.com continues on for several more pages with great ideas of things to carry...if you have room in your vehicle. This is where traveling in a group is helpful as some of the essential items can be shared across several members of the group and thereby lightening the load for each traveler.


Reference: http://www.offroaders.com/recovery-tech ... r-offroad/
Last edited by Jeff-OAUSA on Tue Sep 22, 2020 7:39 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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"If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them something more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it."

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10 Essentials - Urban Survival

#7

Post by Jeff-OAUSA » Mon Sep 21, 2020 8:41 pm

In developing a list of Ten Essentials for Urban Survival, a reasonable schema takes the Systems Approach and spreads the Ten Essentials between one's person and their vehicle or office. The 10E components in the vehicle or office are often stored in a Go Bag.

10E Items on Person

1. Utility.
  • Knife or
  • Multi-Tool
2. Personal Protection
  • Pepper Spray or
  • CCW
3. Wallet
  • Identification (e.g., Driver's License, CCW permit, if applicable);
  • ICE Information;
  • Cash in multiple denominations $5s, $10s, $20s, and $50s (Be prepared to pay straight cash, no change back)
10E Items in Go Bag Stored In Vehicle or Work or Home

4. Quench and Nourishment
  • Bottled Water;
  • Food (e.g., energy bars);
  • Water Treatment (e.g., LifeStraw, Aquatabs)
5. Tools and Supplies
  • Jump Starter or Jumper Cables;
  • Pry Bar;
  • Hatchet or Tomahawk, ideally with a bit/blade on one side and poll hammer on opposite side;
  • Paracord, 50-100 feet;
  • Duct Tape (splurge and get the good stuff like Gorilla and avoid the cheap no name stuff);
  • Bailing Wire, 10-15 feet;
  • Flashlights, Handheld and Headlamp, with extra batteries;
  • Matches in Waterproof holder or Steel and Striker or very reliable lighter;
  • Extra ammunition, magazines
6. Wearables
  • Footwear, boots if you normally wear sport shoes or dress shoes, or tennis shoes if you normally wear boots;
  • Hat appropriate to season, such as bucket hat for summer or stocking hat for winter;
  • Leather gloves;
  • Hooded Sweatshirt for winter or long sleeve tee shirt for summer;
  • Rain gear in rainy season;
  • Bandana
7. First Aid Kit and Medications
  • Prebuilt kits and lists of contents abound. Find a good one, check it thoroughly, and supplement it as needed
  • Personal essential medications (use care in building this supply if it is kept in a vehicle or uncontrolled environment
8. Communication Equipment
  • Hand-held Amateur Radio with extra battery, repeater information, instructions;
  • Cell phone (if major disaster, will be useless except for use as ballast;
  • Charger cables, various connectors, etc.
9. Navigation
  • Paper maps, ideally at State, County, and Local scales, USGS 1:24,000 Scale Topos if in backcountry;
  • Hand-portable GPS with local maps installed
10. Personal Care and Sanity
  • Toilet Paper;
  • Wet Naps;
  • Face Masks;
  • Child/Spouse/Other Dependent Comfort Items. This might be a stuffed toy for a child, a book or Bible for an adult, etc., something to help take their mind off the survival situation in which you have become entwined. There are few things more complicated than trying to deal with an emergency situation when one of your own dependents is having a stress melt down over the same situation.
The entire list above can be generally be carried by one person between their pockets and their Go Bag. This is a good thing in case you run into an emergency while away or into an emergency where you only have time to Grab and Go.

Duffle Bags and backpacks make great Go Bags. An office worker might even find an airline carry on-style suitcase will make a great Go Bag...they store easily in a trunk, in a corner in the workplace, or a closet of the home, and the wheel feature can help with moving the Go Bag from place to place.

If the situation allows a bit more time, you can supplement your Go Bag from things in your vehicle or place of work before the Grab and Go. For example, if needed, you could grab a tire iron from your vehicle if one is normally in the vehicle and not in the Go Bag. Just make sure those items you don't keep in the Go Bag all the time will be there when you need them. I prefer to keep my Go Bag stocked, even is that means some duplicate items between my Go Bag and vehicle.
Last edited by Jeff-OAUSA on Thu Sep 24, 2020 4:57 pm, edited 8 times in total.
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10 Essentials - This or That

#8

Post by Jeff-OAUSA » Mon Sep 21, 2020 9:48 pm

The Ten Essentials are meant to be those minimum "tools" or "items" needed to enhance one's ability to remain in some level of control of certain situations.

The ability to carry the Ten Essentials is always limited by volume or weight, whether that limitation is imposed by pockets, pack, or vehicle. Accordingly, it behooves the outdoors enthusiast to include multi-purpose items items in the development of their 10E supplies.

Below are a few This or That choices one can consider when building their 10E supplies.

A - This or That? Folding Knife Vs Multi-Tool
Buck Folding Hunter-Small.jpeg
Buck Folding Hunter-Small.jpeg (7.94 KiB) Viewed 392 times
Leatherman Rebar MultiTool Small.jpg
Leatherman Rebar MultiTool Small.jpg (13.48 KiB) Viewed 392 times
B - This or That? Jumper Cables Vs Jump Starter
Jumper Cables Small.jpg
Jumper Cables Small.jpg (24.95 KiB) Viewed 391 times
Jump Starter Small.jpeg
Jump Starter Small.jpeg (11.6 KiB) Viewed 391 times
C - This or That? Vehicle Mounted Radio Vs Hand-Held Radio
Mobile-Ham-Mess Small.jpg
Mobile-Ham-Mess Small.jpg (35.38 KiB) Viewed 391 times
Hand Held Amateur Radio Small.jpg
Hand Held Amateur Radio Small.jpg (36.81 KiB) Viewed 391 times
D - This or That? Cell Phone Maps Vs Paper Maps
Cell Phone Map Small.jpg
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Cell System Failure Small.jpg
Cell System Failure Small.jpg (15.58 KiB) Viewed 391 times
Paper Map Small.jpg
Paper Map Small.jpg (30.83 KiB) Viewed 391 times
E - This or That? Tomahawk without Poll Vs Tomahawk with Hammer Poll
Tomahawk No Hanmer Poll Small.jpg
Tomahawk No Hanmer Poll Small.jpg (10.21 KiB) Viewed 374 times
Tomahawk with Hammer Poll small.jpg
Tomahawk with Hammer Poll small.jpg (33.58 KiB) Viewed 374 times
F - This or That? Huge Flashlight Vs Smaller Flashlight Vs Headlamp
Big Flashlight.jpg
Big Flashlight.jpg (7.08 KiB) Viewed 374 times
Small Flashlight Small.jpg
Small Flashlight Small.jpg (12.06 KiB) Viewed 374 times
Headlamp small.jpg
Headlamp small.jpg (20.25 KiB) Viewed 374 times
G - This or That? Small Vs Medium Vs Large First Aid Kit
Small First Aid Kit Small.jpg
Small First Aid Kit Small.jpg (39.84 KiB) Viewed 373 times
Medium First Aid Kit Small.jpg
Medium First Aid Kit Small.jpg (17.59 KiB) Viewed 373 times
Large First Aid Kit Small.jpg
Large First Aid Kit Small.jpg (17.02 KiB) Viewed 373 times
H - This or That? Duffle Style Go Bag Vs Pack Style Go Bag
Go Bag -Duffle Small.jpg
Go Bag -Duffle Small.jpg (17.33 KiB) Viewed 372 times
Go Bag - Pack Small.jpg
Go Bag - Pack Small.jpg (19.55 KiB) Viewed 372 times
Last edited by Jeff-OAUSA on Thu Sep 24, 2020 5:05 pm, edited 11 times in total.
WD6USA

"If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them something more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it."

- Lyndon B. Johnson
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Re: OAUSA Net - 09/24/20 – Situational 10 Essentials

#9

Post by toms » Tue Sep 22, 2020 8:43 am

Communication

Great job Jeff on the list from the different sources.

I think Communication is a big category worthy of being on each of the lists.

In the basic streamlined list, communication can be a whistle.
As we move up to the general category it includes HT's, mobile radio, Sat phone, cell phone, PLB, In-reach, Spot, etc.

Of course all of the electronic means of communication have limits like power. And like the whistle someone has to be able to receive your communication.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

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lrsrngr
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Re: OAUSA Net - 09/24/20 – Situational 10 Essentials

#10

Post by lrsrngr » Wed Sep 23, 2020 7:27 pm

KK6CTT for the online check-in please. Looking forward to the net!
[b]HUA[/b] or "Hooah!" = Heard Understood & Acknowledged. In context: "Roger that sir, HUA!"

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