OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

A preview of future nets
User avatar
DaveK
Site Admin
Posts: 3544
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 10:33 am
Call Sign: K6DTK
Location: Southern California

OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#1

Post by DaveK » Wed Dec 30, 2020 11:02 am

Driving in the Snow and Ice(streets and offroad)

Welcome to our first net of the new year. This has been our traditional time for a net on driving in the snow, and for good reasons. For most of the country, winter has dropped a lot of snow in our deserts, mountains and the other places where we visit for our adventures. Navigating through the white stuff requires different skills and equipment, and that is where our discussion will concentrate.

So, how cold is it?

Well, this map shows that cold weather has gripped much of the USA, and that means there's probably plenty of snow at your favorite mountain or desert camping spot. This is what the weather map looks like this week, one day before the net. (courtesy of Weather Central):

USA Map 1-5-20.jpg
USA Map 1-5-20.jpg (73.37 KiB) Viewed 189 times

If we can offer just one piece of advice (and you know there will be more than one, right?) it would be - SLOW DOWN. We saw this cartoon and thought it conveyed this message rather well:

Too Fast.png
Too Fast.png (59.16 KiB) Viewed 189 times

Without fear of correction, we can state with absolute certainty that a HUGE number of accidents every year are the result of too much speed. Speaking personally, I never cease to be amazed at the quantity of drivers who seem to be oblivious to the dangers of snow and ice, especially on freeways.

Enjoying a drive in the desert

Snow driving in the desert.jpg
Snow driving in the desert.jpg (95.58 KiB) Viewed 159 times

Snow covered road

Snow driving in the desert -1.jpg
Snow driving in the desert -1.jpg (108.95 KiB) Viewed 159 times
DaveK
K6DTK


Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.
Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.

User avatar
DaveK
Site Admin
Posts: 3544
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 10:33 am
Call Sign: K6DTK
Location: Southern California

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#2

Post by DaveK » Tue Jan 05, 2021 10:13 pm

Equipment Suggestions

1. SHOVELS I have two suggestions.
  • Cold Steel Special Forces Shovel
https://www.coldsteel.com/special-forces-shovel/.

The uses for this shovel are many, but one that I have found useful in cold weather is removing stubborn snow and ice from my path. It is tough, well built and easy to store in a vehicle. At about $32.00, it should be in every 4WD, for use in any weather!!!

Cold Steel Shovel -2.jpg
Cold Steel Shovel -2.jpg (108.37 KiB) Viewed 155 times

In fact, it was the tool of choice in getting me back on the trail when a nasty patch of snow and ice took things sideways.

Stuck.JPG
Stuck.JPG (75.92 KiB) Viewed 155 times

  • DMOS Shovel
https://dmoscollective.com/products/the ... ion-shovel

Shovels should be a permanent part of your 4x4 equipment. When room permits, having more than one is also a very good idea - a full size one and a shorty. Choices abound out there, but DMOS Shovels offer what could be the best of both worlds - a shovel that is small and compact (like a shorty) but has the strength and capabilities of a full size. Their Alpha-3 is one such shovel and it is particularly suitable for snow and ice.

The shovels are all made in the USA, and more information and product details are available from the DMOS website.

DMOS Alpha-2b.jpg
DMOS Alpha-2b.jpg (15.01 KiB) Viewed 155 times
DMOS Alpha-2.jpg
DMOS Alpha-2.jpg (11.31 KiB) Viewed 155 times

2. SNOW AND ICE MAT
For all those times when you have to get out of the warm and comfy vehicle to install chains or make repairs, having a mat on which you can kneel or sit, without snow or ice, sure makes for a much more pleasant job. The solution is cheap and the mats are easy to stow in the vehicle. For about $26 you can get a no-slip Ice carpet which adheres firmly to the moisture In the Ice and snow. (measures 10 Feet Long X 30 Inches Wide.) Amazon sells 'em here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008R ... 3c0caaa30c.


Snow Mat.png
Snow Mat.png (1.28 MiB) Viewed 154 times


3. LOW FREEZING POINT WINDSHIELD WASHER FLUID

If you need to clean your windshield or rear window, having windshield de-icing windshield washer fluid, that is still a liquid, can help. Most of the solutions you find in auto parts stores will freeze at the same temp as water. If your situation is one where the temps normally get below freezing, having a washer fluid that is not a solid FROZEN block, can help. See: https://prestone.com/products?detail=AS250
From Prestone's website:
Prestone®’s advanced formula is streak and glare-free, and its -27°F (-33°C) deep freeze protection melts ice quickly, even in the most extreme winter conditions and is safe for rain-sensing windshield wipers.
Prestone De-Icer Windshsield Washer Fluid.jpg
Prestone De-Icer Windshsield Washer Fluid.jpg (29.13 KiB) Viewed 150 times
DaveK
K6DTK


Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.
Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.

User avatar
toms
OAUSA Board Member
Posts: 865
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2008 11:50 am
Call Sign: KI6FHA
Location: Redondo Beach CA (5 miles south of LAX)
Contact:

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#3

Post by toms » Wed Jan 06, 2021 10:42 am

Wheeler Mountain.jpg
Wheeler Mountain.jpg (8.85 MiB) Viewed 172 times

Types of Snow

Like mud, there is a long continuum of types of snow from almost water to deep power. And at each point the water density can change its characteristic. In addition wind shapes, drifts, and pack snow.

For simplicity I like to think of 5 types of snow:
• Powder
• Compacted
• Crust – hard layer on top of a softer layer
• Slush
• Ice

We can use these 5 types to shape our discussion tonight. But first some tips.


RoughWheeler Snow Run.jpg
RoughWheeler Snow Run.jpg (45.65 KiB) Viewed 172 times
4-Wheeling Tips for Winter Driving


1. As with all four-wheeling, remember the buddy system. That is, always go out with at least one other vehicle. It’s fairly easy to get stuck in snow, and the cold just compounds any difficulties you may experience.

2. Make sure you pack survival gear along with food and water.

3. Remember that it gets dark early this time of year, and storms can hit in a hurry.

4. Check the forecast before leaving. You don’t want to get caught in the mountains during a blizzard.

5. Also, cold weather reduces the output of your battery. Replace it if it’s more than five years old. Consider installing a dual battery system as well. That way you’ll have a back up, as well as a source of power in case you need to use the winch.[/list]

Pack your vehicle.

Survival Gear.JPG
Survival Gear.JPG (352.1 KiB) Viewed 172 times


1. a snow shovel,
2. air jack and tire chains, if you have them.
3. Brightly colored equipment is really useful in a snowy environment.
4. An ice scraper/window brush and
5. recovery equipment are a must, also.
6. You’ll want some communications equipment, as well.
Pack ham radio gear if you have it. If not, consider getting licensed. The exam isn’t that difficult and gear is reasonably priced.
If you don’t care to go that route, look into a satellite phone.
Cell phones rarely work in the outback, so don’t count on one.
Low visabiltiy.jpg
Low visabiltiy.jpg (42.91 KiB) Viewed 172 times

Vehicle


Make sure your headlights, tail lights, fog lamps, and license plate are clear of snow. As the old saying goes, you want to see and be seen.

Recon


Upon arriving, spend a few moments surveying the trail and surrounding terrain. One of the biggest problems with snow is that it covers ruts, ditches, and rocks. If you’ve driven the trail before, try to recall where the rough spots are, and avoid them. Don’t try to drive over them, as you risk getting stuck or damaging your vehicle.

Chains
Tire Chains.jpg
Tire Chains.jpg (61.01 KiB) Viewed 172 times
Chains are great for driving in snow.
They give you better traction and braking all around, and better steering up front.
If you have just one set, place them on the back.
Chains up front allow you to chew through deep snow,
but the added braking capability could cause fish tailing. This happens a lot while going downhill on a slippery slope.
Stuck - off the trail.jpg
Stuck - off the trail.jpg (61.93 KiB) Viewed 172 times

Driving

Experiment with air pressure in your ties. On snow it is situational.

Start with full air to cut through.
If that doesn't work, Air down your tires to a standard off-road level.
For a 31-in. tire, that would be in the 18 to 15 psi range.
In extreme situations go to sand pressure - 10-11 PSI.
Just know dealing with a broken bead in the snow is nasty.

Start off in single file as you normally do. The lead vehicle will blaze the trail, but often becomes stuck. Plus, the engine gets packed with snow, so the vehicle doesn’t run well at lower engine temps. Be prepared to pull out that vehicle, but also rotate the vehicles to keep a “fresh” vehicle in the lead at all times and let it warm up. Besides everyone wants to have some fun.

If you get stuck, try rocking the vehicle. You can usually gain a few inches each time, which often is enough to get you onto better ground. Avoid spinning the tires if possible. That just melts the snow underneath, which quickly freezes. Then you’re in worse shape than when you started.

If you’re still unable to drive out, use a recovery strap to pull your vehicle out.
A Pull Pal® can also works in these situations.

Remember to drive slowly. As mentioned above, snow covers all blemishes in the trail. If the snow is firm enough you may actually drive on top. But more likely, you’ll cut through, and expose your vehicle to rocks and other hazards below.

Even with chains, your vehicle behaves quite differently in snow.
Stopping and cornering are more difficult and braking distances are greater.
Drive slower than normal and keep a safe distance between the vehicles. 4WD doesn’t offer any better braking than 2WD, despite what you may think.
If you find yourself sliding one way, turn with it, but also apply some power and stay off the brakes. The 4WD traction will help pull you out of it.


Use gentle acceleration whenever climbing a hill. Quick acceleration can cause the tires to spin, which results in an icy trail. Speaking of hills, assess the trail before descending, and make sure it’s safe to drive. Can you get back up if you had to? If not, and that’s the only way out, take a different route.

Here’s hoping your next romp through the snow is a safe and enjoyable one.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

User avatar
toms
OAUSA Board Member
Posts: 865
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2008 11:50 am
Call Sign: KI6FHA
Location: Redondo Beach CA (5 miles south of LAX)
Contact:

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#4

Post by toms » Wed Jan 06, 2021 10:54 am

Driving Tips – On Highway / Streets

• Make sure your battery is strong –cold reduces output – replace one 5-years old - consider dual battery (backup & winch)
• Make sure your heater & A/C work so you can defrost the windshield
• Make sure headlights, turn signal, license plate are clear of snow
• Keep your gas tank at least half full (in case get stuck)
• Don’t use Cruise control on slippery highway
• Start in 2nd – puts less torque to the tires
• Use 4 HI on snow covered roads
------ o No wind-upon short stretches of dry road if no turns
------ o you can power up to get out of a slide
-------o Can start better on slippery roads
• Check if ABS is disabled in 4-HI – if so pump brakes to stop
• Remember you can’t stop any better than two-wheel drive
• Leave even more space & keep eye on vehicle behind
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

User avatar
toms
OAUSA Board Member
Posts: 865
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2008 11:50 am
Call Sign: KI6FHA
Location: Redondo Beach CA (5 miles south of LAX)
Contact:

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#5

Post by toms » Wed Jan 06, 2021 10:58 am

How to Survive in Your Vehicle Stuck in Snow
Yellow Jeep Stuck.jpg
Yellow Jeep Stuck.jpg (248.37 KiB) Viewed 172 times
You don’t have to be out in the country to encounter a hazardous situation. You can get socked in while driving home from work one day. If you’re stuck, you can bet that hundreds of other motorists are, as well. Help could be hours away.

Every situation is unique, but the following guidelines apply in all situations, and could save your life.

Prepare for winter driving

“Safety is no accident,” as the old saying goes. We discussed that before in 10 Safety Rules For Off-Road Driving and in a related column, Your Gear Is Not Complete Without An Emergency Packet! Winter presents its own set of hazards, which require additional preparation. It starts with a survival kit. Make sure yours includes at least some of these items.

Survival Kit
More of a collection of items, a winter survival kit includes extra food and clothing, items to help you prepare food or water, signaling/communications gear, and some means to free yourself.

Food should be dry, packaged goods that have a long shelf life. These include granola bars, snack mix/trail mix, canned nuts, graham crackers, and hard candy. Thick canned food, like ravioli, may be added. Avoid soups as the can may freeze and burst. For a few extra dollars you can add military style MRE (Meals Ready to Eat) available on line and at military surplus stores.

Make sure the packages and cans are easy to open. It’s unlikely you’ll have a can opener or scissors with you.

Extra clothing can include boots, gloves, a blanket or sleeping bag, and a hat. This stuff can be bulky, so choose wisely. I pack a Thinsulate™ sleeping bag. It’s warm but thin, and compresses into a nice, small size (more likely to still be in the vehicle when I need it).

Liquids It’s easy to get dehydrated in the winter, so you should carry some liquids. Even if you normally carry a water bottle, be prepared to produce water by melting snow. (Avoid eating snow, as that will lower your body temperature.) Pack an empty soup or coffee can along with a small stove or burner. Jetboil® offers a line of nifty mini cookers. They work great with food, as well.

Communication If you become stuck, you’re likely to reach for your cell phone. Keep an extra battery pack or the cord for tapping into the car’s cigarette lighter. You should also keep some fresh flashlight batteries.

Pack a red or orange flag that you can attach to your antenna. That will help rescuers spot your vehicle. (If you don’t have a flag, a large piece of fabric will work.) A small shovel can come in handy, also. Buy the kind with a curved blade and collapsible handle.

Ham radio equipment can be very useful, especially when you’re outside of cell range. If possible, take along some radio gear (but remember that ham radio requires a license). Flares are useful, too, especially at night. Have one or two in your vehicle.

Recovery Gear Consider packing small pieces of carpet or a set of Sand Ladders. Also, being stuck can be boring. Have some reading material or puzzle books with you to pass the time. Speaking of reading material, newspapers and magazines can be used for body insulation.

Get in the habit of keeping your gas tank at least half full. You’ll need the fuel to run your engine on occasion. More on that later.

Another “item” you can pack is awareness. It’s easy to get distracted or start daydreaming while behind the wheel. Memorize mile markers or street/highway signs as you pass by. You’ll help rescuers immensely if you can tell dispatch where you are. A GPS is useful to pin point your location.

What to do if you’re stuck

If you’re ever stuck in a blizzard, follow these suggestions.

1.Try not to panic. You’ll need a clear head to work yourself through this situation. Maintain your composure, and calm down your passengers as needed.

2.Stay with your vehicle. It’s a lot easier to spot from a distance. Leaving your vehicle, and the comfort and protection it offers, can be dangerous. You may think you’ll be able to get help. Odds are you’ll become disoriented and freeze to death.

3.Attach a flag or colored piece of clothing to the antenna. This helps rescuers and lessens the possibility of being hit by another driver.

4.Run the engine only 10 – 15 minutes each hour. Sure, you want to stay warm, but you need to conserve your gas. Also, the less often you run your engine, the less chance for lethal levels of carbon monoxide to build up.

5.Crack a window on the downwind side (leeward side) of the car. That air will be chilly, but it’ll also be clean.

6.Clear the exhaust pipe periodically.

7.If you decide to dig yourself out, start on the leeward side of the car. Don’t exert yourself, because you need to minimize sweating. Getting damp and cold can be deadly. Brush off the snow before reentering your vehicle.

8.As a last resort, burn your spare tire. The smoke (or fire) will be visible for miles.
See you on the Trail!
TomS
KI6FHA / WPZW486

Badlands Off-Road
tom@4x4training.com
http://www.4x4training.com

User avatar
Hmfigueroa
OAUSA Board Member
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:28 pm
Call Sign: Ke6vrl
Contact:

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#6

Post by Hmfigueroa » Thu Jan 07, 2021 4:01 pm

Be careful on any slopes when you lose forward momentum. You will quickly find yourself sliding sideways.

A full length shovel is very useful to clear snow from the center of the vehicle.
59A41B11-971E-430F-A5E2-297626A311DC.jpeg
59A41B11-971E-430F-A5E2-297626A311DC.jpeg (2.48 MiB) Viewed 164 times
459712AC-FFA3-42AB-ABB9-A62A3A70B83A.jpeg
459712AC-FFA3-42AB-ABB9-A62A3A70B83A.jpeg (2.26 MiB) Viewed 164 times
A1AC24E2-7106-4AC7-A5D1-5A48CAA88176.jpeg
A1AC24E2-7106-4AC7-A5D1-5A48CAA88176.jpeg (2.85 MiB) Viewed 164 times
A great lightweight and packable full length shovel is available from DMOS Collective https://dmoscollective.com/?gclid=CjwKC ... TcQAvD_BwE there are several new models since I purchased mine. It works great with silicone spray on it to prevent sticking. Nice aluminum handle and made in the USA.
Hector Figueroa
Toyota FJC
Kenwood TS-480HX SCS DR-7800 Tarheel 2
Yaesu FTM-400XDR

User avatar
Voodoo Blue 57
Posts: 221
Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 11:41 pm
Call Sign: W6PET
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#7

Post by Voodoo Blue 57 » Thu Jan 07, 2021 5:56 pm

Chain Installation Tip

Start by laying out chain behind wheel placing block (I've been using a 2X4) in the 2nd or 3rd link from end. Depends on tire size, I'd play with it at home before hitting the snow.

Chain Ground.jpg
Chain Ground.jpg (6.06 MiB) Viewed 157 times

Next back vehicle over chain stopping so that the tire is resting on top of block. With tire elevated it is easy to pull chain around tire making adjustments as necessary.

Chain Side without Strap.jpg
Chain Side without Strap.jpg (3.3 MiB) Viewed 157 times

Pull chain around tire adjusting as necessary and install side straps.

Chain Side Strap.jpg
Chain Side Strap.jpg (2.71 MiB) Viewed 157 times

This is what the tire looks like from the rear with chains installed. As you can see, the chain and tire are off the ground.

Chain on Block.jpg
Chain on Block.jpg (1.49 MiB) Viewed 157 times

I have been using a 2X4 but I'm considering buy one of of these to get the tire higher off the ground. It's only $14.40 on Amazon right now. https://www.amazon.com/Camco-Leveling-B ... s9dHJ1ZQ==

Block.jpg
Block.jpg (45.53 KiB) Viewed 157 times
Last edited by Voodoo Blue 57 on Thu Jan 07, 2021 8:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Phil
"I’d rather be in the mountains thinking of God, than in church thinking about the mountains."
John Muir

User avatar
Voodoo Blue 57
Posts: 221
Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 11:41 pm
Call Sign: W6PET
Location: Southern California
Contact:

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#8

Post by Voodoo Blue 57 » Thu Jan 07, 2021 5:57 pm

Early Checkin Please!
Phil
"I’d rather be in the mountains thinking of God, than in church thinking about the mountains."
John Muir

H380
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2020 7:55 pm
Call Sign: AA6AZ

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#9

Post by H380 » Thu Jan 07, 2021 6:26 pm

Please check me in AA6AZ, Bob, Apple Valley.

Diesel4x
Posts: 112
Joined: Thu Jul 20, 2017 6:49 pm
Call Sign: KF6KOC

Re: OAUSA Net - January 7, 2021 - Driving in the Snow and Ice (streets and offroad)

#10

Post by Diesel4x » Thu Jan 07, 2021 6:29 pm

Thanks for early check in, KF6RGR Becky & KF6KOC Randy.

Post Reply

Return to “OAUSA AMATEUR RADIO NET PREVIEW”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 2 guests